What’s the difference between CMYK & RGB?

Why does my print look different than my screen? What does CMYK stand for? What does RGB stand for? Why does it matter? CMYK is used for print. CMYK stands for Cyan Magenta Yellow & Black. They are the four basic colors used in printer inks and can mix to make nearly every color (they generally don’t print white). When ink is mixed to make a color, it uses the subtractive method. The more colors you combine, the less of each color you see. Paint works the same was as ink. If you mix several colors together, you end up with a muddy mess…or if you have enough pigment, it turns black. RGB is used for digital/web. RGB stands for Red Green Blue. These are the three basis colors of light used to mix colors on a screen (they do make white). When light is mixed to make a color, it uses the additive method and range from no light (black) to 100% light (white). Think about a prism. When white light shines through a prism, it gets broken apart to show a rainbow. So white light is when all the colors in the visible spectrum are present. Why use each? It’s best to use CMYK for print so your printer knows how much of each colored ink to mix to create the color you want. It’s also best to use RGB for digital publishing so your screen knows how to mix the light to create the color you want. Although an RGB document can be printed and look OKAY, most screens will really mess up a CMYK image....
How to See Who Likes Your Facebook Page

How to See Who Likes Your Facebook Page

You’ve probably seen them… maybe even participated in a few. The Facebook contest promising you a chance to win something if you Like their page and comment an answer below. But how in the world do the page admins know if you’ve actually done it or not? Page likes used to be easy to find, but in Facebook’s ever-change style they’ve made it a bit harder. How to see who likes and follows your Facebook Page in 2017: Go to the Facebook Page you want to check (you must be an admin) Click on Settings in the top Right Choose People and Other Pages in the left-hand navigation That’s it! This section also offers some sorting and search features which is really nice if you’re trying to confirm entries for followers who might have liked your page months or even years ago. ...
Using Calendly to Automate Appointment Requests

Using Calendly to Automate Appointment Requests

Finding a time that works for both my schedule and my clients can be a challenge. As business owners, executive directors and – often times – volunteers, we have a lot on our plates. Add in the personal stuff and calendars quickly look full. In an effort to streamline and make things easier in the long-run right from the get-go I’ve implemented an appointment scheduling tool. It’s called Calendly.  Not to be confused with the social media scheduler Calendy which I stumbled on accidentally recently. Why Use a Scheduler? Instead of emailing times/days that work back and forth and back and forth and…well, you get it, playing phone tag or interrupting effective productivity time with texts I can set my schedule of availability and let clients pick a day and time that works best for them. While I love the personal interaction with each person and company that I work with, using a scheduling tool like Calendly allows my calendar to fill itself. How Does Calendly Work? After you set up a free account, you log in. The first thing you see is the Dashboard which shows you upcoming appointments which can be filtered. You will want to navigate to the Event Type section to edit the pre-made filler or create your own. Each Event Type can have completely different settings, availability and follow-up to tailor the process. Edit the Event Type and you’ll see settings for availability. This is the section I especially love since I’m trying to block out my time to be more effective. So, I offer some meetings during business hours, but the longer consulting meetings...
How to delete a Blogger blog

How to delete a Blogger blog

Did you hop on the Blogger bus back in the day…or maybe more recently? If you’re like me, you later discovered or were introduced to WordPress and fell in love, leaving Blogger in the dust. Think it would be beneficial to clean up your old profiles and listings? You betcha! Here’s a 3-step #howto with screenshots of how to delete a blogger blog: Login to your Blogger account and choose “Settings” for the blog you want to delete. Choose “Other” in your settings. Click on”Delete blog” in your blog tools and confirm. Here’s an image for your downloading, viewing and pinning...

What makes a good business card?

You know you need something to hand out – to give to anyone and everyone interested in your product or services. But what makes a good business card? Make it Memorable A good business card makes an impression. It is different from all the others in your potential customer’s junk drawer. This can be accomplished with a unique size, shape, paper weight, finish or design. Check out these unconventional business card ideas. Here’s some interesting products available online: Moo Luxury Business cards  Moo Minicards Moo Raised Spot Gloss cards VistaPrint Metallic Finish VistaPrint Folded Cards VistaPrint Ultra Thick Request an Action A good business card invites your potential customer (or existing!) to take action. Here are some ideas for offers and calls to action to include on your business cards: Free estimate Coupon for future services Hashtag to use when posting about your business Referral perk ($ or in-store credit) for recommending or leaving an online review Share Your Vitals What information do people need to get in touch with you. Do you prefer text over phone calls? Email over voicemail? Provide your contacts with the most vital information. Typical contact information includes: Name Company name and/or logo Street Address Phone Email Website Additional information might include social media profile icons, mission statements or a list of services provided. Remember, the more information you include the more information they have to decipher to find what they want. Make your primary preferred method of communication the most important and easiest to find. Are you in need of a good business card? I can help you make some excellent choices to get...

Why You Didn’t Even Get An Interview

You applied for what you thought was your dream graphic design job – or at least a change of scenery that shouldn’t bore you in 8-12 months. You thought you were a top candidate…so why didn’t you even get a phone call or past the “Thank you for your interest.” email? 1. Your Resume Wasn’t Up to Par As a graphic designer, your resume should be in tip-top shape. It needs to look like something a professional would produce. It should have some personality, but it also needs to be tailored to your target audience: the hiring manager – and probably the senior designer(s) already on staff. Tip 1: The three most important pieces of information you need to make sure are easy to find are Your name A link to your portfolio Your phone number and email 2. Your Portfolio Wasn’t Up to Par You might think that invitation you did for Aunt Effie’s cat-ladies-only party was cute and showed off your photoshopping skills, but in reality it stunk to high-heaven. Or maybe your stuff is really IS good, but this new position doesn’t work in any of the mediums your work represents. Tip 2: Your portfolio should reflect the diversity of the mediums you have experience with. Showing side-projects that stretch your creative skills outside your normal work-flow not only display your ability to adapt, but also your passion for the industry outside your paycheck. 3. You Weren’t a Good Fit The hiring manager (and any assistants they ask for help) know the position best. They’re looking for someone who is not only qualified to do the...